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viernes, 20 de mayo de 2011

Apologetic Brahma Seeks Pardon from Krishna (From the Shrimad Bhagavata Purana)




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Sheran-wali Mata Pendant



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Sheran-wali Mata Pendant


Código del Artículo: JRG61


Sterling Silver



3.0" Height


2.8" Width


25.59 gms


Precio: Euro 137.00


Apologetic Brahma Seeks Pardon from Krishna (From the Shrimad Bhagavata Purana)

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Apologetic Brahma Seeks Pardon from Krishna (From the Shrimad Bhagavata Purana)


Código del Artículo: OR81


Oil on Canvas with 24 Karat Gold

34.5 inches X 48.0 inches


Precio: Euro 324.00


Descripción


This beautiful painting composed with brilliant portraits of Krishna and four-faced Brahma illustrates the legend of an apologetic Brahma appearing before Krishna with folded hands seeking his pardon for the mischief that he had done him. The artist has retained the venue of the legend – Yamuna’s bank and adjacent forest where Krishna and his mates took their cows to graze, but has added to it a majestic throne with golden backrest and gems-studded gold umbrella. It has been raised on massive gold legs and has been provided with a footrest with velvet cushion – something unrealistic in context to the legend. It was actually after seeing Krishna in the ordinary or rather mean surroundings of a cowherd boy – seated under a tree and sporting with other poorly clad cowherd boys, that Brahma grew suspicious of Krishna’s genuineness as Vishnu’s incarnation but the artist, while retaining the spot and other things, alternated the clay-mound or rock that Krishna might have used to seat on with a majestic throne.


As the episode appears in the Bhagavata Purana and other texts, one day Brahma, when passing across, saw a human being who looked like Lord Vishnu sporting with a band of cowherd boys around the bank of river Yamuna. He was none other than Krishna. However, Brahma could not concede as to why Lord Vishnu would come down to such level as to live like a low-born cowherd and graze cattle. For his satisfaction he decided to test the genuineness of this Vishnu-like looking human being. As decided, Brahma led away all cows grazing around and hid them in a secret den. Not finding their cows anywhere Krishna’s mates rushed to him and told him that their cows weren’t seen anywhere. Krishna himself went in their search but could not trace even a sign of where they had gone. Dismayed he came back to his mates but only to find that they too had now disappeared. He immediately realised that someone, and he could be none other than Brahma, was doing a trick for testing his power. Deciding to pay him in the same coin he created with his divine power all cows and cowherds in the same numbers and forms as were the real ones and with them returned to Vrindavana.


About a year passed when Brahma recalled the episode. He thought that he should find out as to what happened after he had hid the cows and cowherds. He went to Yamuna’s banks where he had seen Krishna and his friends grazing their cows. To his utter surprise Brahma found the same cows grazing around and the same cowherds sporting with Krishna, though those that he had hid – the original ones, were still in his custody. He immediately realised that the man whose genuineness he tried to test was none other than Lord Vishnu who with his divine power had created identical lots of cows and cowherds for rendering his trick ineffective. Apprehending Vishnu’s displeasure for the mischief that he had done him he rushed to Krishna and apologised for it with a bowed head and folded hands.


In scriptural tradition Krishna was of about five years of age when the event took place, though in the tradition of art, as here, he has been often portrayed in his youth. Again, different from the Bhagavata Purana’s version where he is an ordinary cowherd boy, in art tradition he is often painted as crowned and bejewelled but not in such majesty with an imperial throne under him as here in this painting. The flute carried under his armpit and the peacock feather fastened to his hair apart, he has been portrayed with all his lavish jewels and a gems-studded crest more like Lord Vishnu in his imperial frame rather than Krishna, a cowherd. Far stranger is Brahma’s iconography. The age-ridden grey-haired and grey-bearded tough form of Brahma, in scriptural as well as art traditions, has been alternated here in this portrayal with a vigorous youth endowed with feminine beauty and tenderness. But for his four faces and four arms and rosary and ‘kamandala’ – water-pot with spout, his characteristic attributes in them, he has been conceived more as the tradition conceives love-god Kama rather than with Brahma’s iconography. Medieval paintings illustrating the legend usually portrayed a number of cows, with or without a Brahma-like figure carrying them away; but instead, this painting lays greater emphasis on portraits of the two figures and in them it is simply outstanding.


This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.


Jambavant Offers His Daughter and Shyamantaka Gem to Shri Krishna (Shrimad Bhagavata Purana 10.57)



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Jambavant Offers His Daughter and Shyamantaka Gem to Shri Krishna (Shrimad Bhagavata Purana 10.57)


Código del Artículo: WK59


Water Color Painting On Cotton Fabric

33.5 inches X 21.5


Precio: Euro 111.00


Descripción


Satrajit, who lived in Dwarka, was a great devotee of the Sun, so the Sun presented him with a gem called Shyamantaka. The Gem gave eight units (754 kilos) of gold every day. Shri Krishna told Satrajit, “Such a valuable item should be kept guarded as a National treasure. You should give it to King Ugrasen.” Satrajit refused to take his advice, and gave the Gem to his brother, Prasen.


One day, Prasen rode out hunting, wearing the Gem. Both Prasen and his horse were killed by a lion. Then Jambavant the bear killed the lion and took the Gem.


Thus, the Gem changed several hands. However, back at Dwarka, Shri Krishna’s reputation was marred by a rumor that He had stolen the Gem. It is seen, here, how innocent people are blamed unfairly. When even Shri Krishna faced slander, how can anyone hope to escape it?


The Lord Shri Krishna began to take steps to clear His name. He searched till he reached Jambavan’s cave. A number of highly respected citizens were with Him. Shri Krishna told them to wait outside, and entered the cave alone.


Inside the cave, there was a confrontation between Jambavant and Shri Krishna. They wrestled fiercely for twenty eight days. Ultimately Jambavant recognized that this was the Lord Incarnate, and gave – not only the Gem – but also his daughter, Jambavati, to Shri Krishna.


This description from the Shrimad Bhagavata Purana 10.57.


This painting was created in the town of Kishangarh, Rajasthan.


The First Offence of One's Child Deserves to be Forgiven (Bhagavata Purana 10.16.51)



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The First Offence of One's Child Deserves to be Forgiven (Bhagavata Purana 10.16.51)


Código del Artículo: WE86


Water Color Painting On Cotton Fabric



1.7 feet x 2.5 feet


Precio: Euro 156.00


Descripción


During the course of his dance, Krishna kicked and bent down whichever head was raised by the serpent who was profusely emitting poison from its eyes and hissing with rage. In this manner did Krishna subdue it. (Bhagavata Purana 10.16.29)


With its umbrella like hoods being crushed and wounded by the violent and unearthly dance, the serpent, all the limbs of whose body were shattered, remembered Narayana, the Creator of all that is mobile and immobile, mentally resorting to him for refuge. (10.16.30)


Finding their serpent-husband collapsing under the infinite weight of Krishna carrying (innumerable) worlds in his abdomen, and its hoods shattered under the strokes of Krishna's heels, the distressed wives of the serpent Kaliya with their clothes and ornaments in disorder approaches the Lord, saying: (10.16.31)


"The first offence of one's child (as does a king to his people), deserves to be forgiven by the master. Oh tranquil-minded Lord (shanta-atman)! Be pleased to pardon this thick-minded creature who does not recognize you. (10.16.51)


Be gracious to him, Oh Lord. He is on the point of death. Let our life in the form of our husband be granted to us helpless women (abala), who have always been treated compassionately by the righteous." (10.16.52)


A Vision for Meditation on the Supreme Lord Narayana (Shrimad Bhagavatam 11.14.37-41)



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A Vision for Meditation on the Supreme Lord Narayana (Shrimad Bhagavatam 11.14.37-41)


Código del Artículo: WD19


Water Color Painting On Silk Fabric
Artist Shri Vitthal Das Rathore



1.1 feet x 1.5 feet


Precio: Euro 95.00


Lord Vishnu in the Form of Sattvaguna Conquers Rajoguna and Tamoguna



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Lord Vishnu in the Form of Sattvaguna Conquers Rajoguna and Tamoguna


Código del Artículo: HI82


Watercolor on Paper



Artist: Kailash Raj


7.0 inches X 12.0 inches


Precio: Euro 347.00


Descripción


The myth of annihilation of Madhu and Kaitabha appeared first in the Shanti Parva of the Mahabharata. Later, with a few variations, it appeared in the Devi Bhagavata Purana. As goes the myth, after the Great Deluge Mahavishnu lay asleep on the water's surface. Long after from his navel grew a lotus, out of which subsequently emerged Brahma. Staying in the lotus he engaged himself in meditation and in reciting Vedas. Meanwhile some ear-wax emitted from the ears of Mahavishnu and from it were born two demons, named Madhu and Kaitabha. According to the Mahabharata, Madhu and Kaitabha were born from two drops of water that Mahavishnu had created in the lotus. One of the two drops was sweet like Madhu -honey, and hence, Madhu, the name of the demon born of it. He stood for Tamas - darkness, one of the three attributes of cosmos. The other drop was hard. From this drop was born Kaitabha representing Rajas - activity.


Born and grown up in water Madhu and Kaitabha had exceptional power to walk on water's surface and under it, which had made them arrogant and proud. They wondered how this big flood came into being. One day, Devi appeared and taught them the 'Vagbija mantra' - hymn of the origin of logos. Reciting the hymn they performed Devi's worship for a thousand years. Appeased by their worship Devi appeared and told them to ask whatever they desired. They wished that they should die in the manner they chose. The wish was granted. Their arrogance now multiplied. One day, they stole Brahma's Vedas and with them hid in the nether world. Brahma went after them but tortured and frightened by them came back. He went to Mahavishnu and sought his help in restoring Vedas. Mahavishnu went to Madhu and Kaitabha but they refused to return the scriptures. Mahavishnu raised arms against them but it yielded no result. Under a strategy, when one fought with him the other rested and thus they tired Mahavishnu who was battling non-stopped. It continued for a thousand years. Finally, Devi appeared and revealed that they would not be killed unless they themselves disclosed the manner by which they could be killed. Mahavishnu feigned to give up arms and lauded the demons for their great valour. He told that he would grant them anything they wished. As anticipated, the demons laughed and said that they were superior to him and hence he should ask them whatever he wanted from them. Mahavishnu instantly said that he wished to kill them and asked them to grant this wish. With no other option left, they granted his wish but with the condition that he could kill them but not inside the water. Mahavishnu instantly expanded his thighs so far that like earth they reached above water. The demons expanded their bodies many more times leaving waters far below. Vishnu expanded his thighs further, caught hold of the demons, held them on his thighs and cut their throats with his disc.


The Salvation of Hiranyakasyapu (Shrimad Bhagavata Purana)



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The Salvation of Hiranyakasyapu (Shrimad Bhagavata Purana)


Código del Artículo: HI77

Watercolor on Old Paper
Artist: Vinod Bhardwaj

7.5 inches X 10.0 inches


Precio: Euro 133.00


Hamsa Damayanti



Availability: Sólo Uno en la acción
Hamsa Damayanti


Código del Artículo: OS99


Oil on Canvas



Artist: Anup Gomay


37.0 inch X 60.0 inch


Precio: Euro 362.00






















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